“Good morning Geneseo, this is Mike and Max in the Morning,” is a familiar wake-up call for many area students and adults.   It is from Geneseo High School seniors Max Haverland and Mike Miller every Monday and Wednesday morning when they broadcast their morning sports talk show from the radio broadcasting station at the high school.

 


“Good morning Geneseo, this is Mike and Max in the Morning,” is a familiar wake-up call for many area students and adults.   It is from Geneseo High School seniors Max Haverland and Mike Miller every Monday and Wednesday morning when they broadcast their morning sports talk show from the radio broadcasting station at the high school.

The show airs from 7:15 to 7:50 a.m. on Radio 100.5 FM-WGRG and on Geneseo cable channel 50, ending just in time for the two students to get to their first hour class.  Their radio show is not part of any class at the high school and they do not receive classroom credit, but they were quick to add that doesn’t matter to them. 

“We do it merely for enjoyment and to learn a little more about broadcasting,” Miller said.  Both Haverland and Miller are interested in sports journalism in their futures.

After high school graduation, Haverland plans to attend a small university and play golf, and Miller also plans to attend a university and study “either history or sports journalism.”

“We almost always run the show together, unless one of us is sick and then the other finds a substitute, usually recruiting one of our friends,” Haverland said.

The two young men are not just friends, but also cousins.  Max is the son of Mike and Melinda Haverland and Mike’s parents are Paul and Laurie Miller.   The radio sports talk show is something they have wanted to do for some time.

“We thought of the talk show last year and the idea developed immensely from there,” Miller said. 

They approached Radio Club organizer and high school instructor Greg Smith who worked with them in helping their idea become a reality.

“He helped teach us how to ‘get on the air,’ and now we can operate the station pretty well on our own,” Miller said.

“By the third day of this school year, we were up and running,” Haverland said.

The two radio personalities open their morning show by a short conversation between each other, and then go right to the national sports scene.

 “From there we move to pro and college teams, of all sports, before focusing on the local sports scene,” Miller said.

“We talk 99 per cent about sports, and we begin with national sports news, and then move into area and local news, talking and voicing opinions on each subject,” Haverland said.

“We also bring in special guests, usually high school athletes and talk to them for a portion of the show, asking questions about themselves and talking about their specific sport,” Miller said.

They describe their preparation for each show as “pretty casual.”

 “We each jot down some notes, and someone brings in a newspaper so we can use information from that source, and we also have a computer to use in the broadcasting room,” Miller said. 
“Our show is not at all scripted; we talk conversationally back and forth with each other about any sports topic that we find of interest.”

One of the features of the show is to take calls from the public.

“That is a neat part of the show,” Miller said, “because they can hear themselves on the air.”
Smith, technology education teacher and advisor for the Radio Club, said there is a radio broadcasting class available at the high school which offers training to use the broadcasting equipment and “go in depth about radio broadcastings, which includes the history of radio,” he said.  “Most of radio broadcasting comes from the members of the Radio Club. 

He said the school radio station broadcasts mainly music from the 1980’s, “but we also have music collections dating back to the 50’s.”

Smith said Haverland and Miller both have been well prepared for their morning sports talk show.  “They have a strong knowledge of what they are talking about.”

Smith is the general radio station manager and students involved are Joey Eaker as the “technical guru,” with John Mullin as student station manager.

There is no music and no advertising on the show, just sports conversation from “Mike and Max in the Morning.”

Both Haverland and Miller agree they are willing to put in the extra effort to keep the radio show going, in addition to their classroom schedules because “it is something we have fun doing, we like sitting around talking about sports,” Miller said.

“We have heard we are getting pretty popular, so who knows, we may be on ESPN someday,” Haverland added.