Though Dutch, the cat found tortured and nailed to a utility pole in rural Geneseo, died from his injuries, his story is helping an injured dog in Hancock County.


Though Dutch, the cat found tortured and nailed to a utility pole in rural Geneseo, died from his injuries, his story is helping an injured dog in Hancock County.

The stray dog, a female German shepherd, was found emaciated with a broken leg.

Dr. Steven Renard of Hancock Veterinary Clinic estimated the dog’s leg had been fractured a month before and had started to heal nearly five inches shorter than its other hind leg. The mismatched bone was sticking out from the skin.

Anissa Sadeghi of the West Hancock Canine Rescue put out an urgent appeal asking for funds to help pay for the dog’s surgery.

“We’d received e-mails from Anissa before for things like dog transports, but we’d never received a message like this saying an animal needed surgery and financial help was needed,” said Karen Russell, president of the Geneseo Chapter of the Henry County Humane Society.

Days earlier, the humane society had stepped forward and offered to pay medical expenses for the abused cat.

Hearing Dutch’s story, donors from across the country sent funds to the Henry County Humane Society. “We received about $9,000 from all over the country. The funds would, obviously, more than pay for Dutch’s expenses,” said Russell.

The board, which traditionally pays for emergency animal care out of its operating fund, established the “Dutch Memorial?Fund.”

“We set up the emergency fund in case something like Dutch happened here again. Helping animals outside our local area didn’t really cross our mind,” said Russell.

But when the e-mail about the injured dog arrived, humane society board members felt they could be of assistance.

“We felt this was the type of thing people had in mind when they donated,” said?Russell. “We felt good that we were in a position to help.”

From the “Dutch Memorial Fund” up to $800 was authorized to be used for the German shepherd’s surgery.

According to Dr. Renard, during surgery, the dog’s leg was re-broken and positioned correctly and a steel rod was put in her leg to keep it in alignment.

The dog will remain at the veterinarian’s office to recuperate for more than a month. The dog also has a dislocated hip, and surgery to remove the ball from the joint to allow the hip to fuse may be needed.

When the West Hancock Canine Rescue volunteers learned the Dutch Memorial Fund would help pay for the dog’s surgery “They were shocked and overwhelmed” said Russell.