Ann Nardulli, 69, of Savoy, passed away at home on June 27, 2018, surrounded by family after a battle with cancer. A memorial service will be at 10:30 a.m. July 21 Wesley United Methodist Church, 1203 W. Green St., in Urbana. In lieu of flowers, contributions can be made to the University of Illinois Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology for graduate student support.

Ann Nardulli, 69, of Savoy, passed away at home on June 27, 2018, surrounded by family after a battle with cancer. A memorial service will be at 10:30 a.m. July 21 Wesley United Methodist Church, 1203 W. Green St., in Urbana. In lieu of flowers, contributions can be made to the University of Illinois Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology for graduate student support.

Ann was born in Morrison, the daughter of Rita and Rudolph Wannemacher of Hooppole. She graduated from Northern Illinois University with a bachelor of science degree in education and taught elementary school in Addison, where she had a reputation as a devoted and innovative teacher.

After moving to Urbana, she earned a master’s degree and PhD from the Department of Physiology and Biophysics at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; completed postdoctoral work in the Department of Biochemistry. Subsequently, she joined the Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, where she spent her career teaching and studying the effects of estrogen in the female. She was extraordinarily fortunate to work with many wonderful students, postdoctoral fellows, and scientists who became part of an extended scientific family. She loved learning about new scientific innovations and exploring ways to address novel areas of research. The research carried out in her laboratory was funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Department of Defense and her work was published in a variety of scientific journals.

Ann was a devoted member of the University of Illinois faculty. She served on numerous departmental, school, and university committees and was particularly fond of spending time with the Hormone Chixx, a group of women from across campus who studied the effects of hormones in the body. She discovered that introducing students to the wonders of human physiology and endocrinology was extremely rewarding and was recognized for her teaching excellence. Her interest in student welfare prompted her to serve as a member and chair of the Athletic Board and participate in the Department of Intercollegiate Athletics NCAA Certification Committee.

Ann was active in the world's largest and oldest organization devoted to research on hormones, the Endocrine Society, where she served on various committees. As a member and chair of the society’s advocacy committee, she visited Washington, D.C. numerous times to meet with legislators on Capitol Hill to lobby for increased scientific research funding.

Ann spent many hours at the Mettler Center exercising and getting to know people who became dear friends. She also enjoyed gardening and cooking with the vegetables she raised. On Sundays, she could be found at Wesley Methodist Church enjoying the extraordinary music that filled the sanctuary.

Above all, Ann’s favorite activity was spending time with her family. Watching her children and grandchildren grow and develop into the very special individuals that they have become was her joy. Family visits to Michigan were a special source of many wonderful memories.

Ann is survived by her husband, Peter; two children (Marc Nardulli and Beth Conlon) and their spouses (Jessica Nardulli and Joseph Conlon); and four devoted and loving grandchildren (Peter and Eric Nardulli and Jack and Lexi Conlon). She also is survived by two brothers, Bruce Wannemacher and his wife Barbara of Augusta, Ga., and James Wannemacher and his wife Cathy of Geneseo.